THE EXTENT TO WHICH AUSTRALIAN LAW(S) ON BREACH OF CONFIDENCE PROTECTS PERSONAL PRIVACY
Auteur Melle Joëlle Béderède ,
Publié le 18/03/2002
Ordre juridique - Australien
Domaines Informatique et libertés, Vie privée
Langue - Anglais
Format html/php
Abstract

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Resumé

Traditionally used in a commercial framework to protect trade secrets, the equitable action for breach of confidence has widely expanded its scope to any situation involving a secret confidence, to reach ultimately the intimate realm of personal relationships (Prince Albert v Strange [1849]2 De G & Sm 652; 64 ER 293). It is however the relationship of confidence that the law seeks to protect, rather than the information itself, for property in information has not been recognised on its own1.
The doctrine has otherwise suffered from instability and uncertainty with regards to its legal basis, but all calls for a reform in order to formulate this remedy as a statutory tort have been put aside2, notwithstanding several amendments that gave the duty of confidence itself a statutory basis (infra). Nonetheless, three traditional elements are well embedded in the jurisprudence, pointed out by Megarry J in Coco v A N Clark (Engineers) Ltd3 and widely cited and applied as a general test for establishing liability

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